Gov’t to Craft 10-Year Development Plan for Health Sector

first_imgRelatedMinister of Health Calls on 4H Clubs to Promote Healthy Lifestyles The Government of Jamaica is to craft a 10-year development plan for the country’s health sector.Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, said the process will get underway this year, through Cabinet’s approval of the Primary Health Care Renewal Policy.“This will result in a quantum shift in the way we offer health care to Jamaicans,” he said.The Health Minister was speaking on Wednesday, April 29, at the opening ceremony for a high level dialogue on Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston.The 10-year development plan is part of continued efforts by the Government to ensure universal access and universal health coverage for Jamaicans.Dr. Ferguson said that a number of “far-reaching measures” have already been put in place, including decentralisation of the health management structure to facilitate decision-making at the local level; increasing access to pharmaceuticals through the creation and consistent updating of the Vital, Essential and Necessary (VEN) List of Drugs; and doubling of the 2015/16 health budget to $8 billion.“We have embarked on a programme of Primary Health Care Infrastructure renewal to provide quality health services and increase access at the community level,” Dr. Ferguson said, noting that four primary health care centres of excellence have been created, which will eventually be used as models to create similar facilities across the island.“These provide greater services than what we would traditionally be able to access at the health centre level and they operate as mini-hospitals,” he said, noting that significant improvements have also been made to the secondary care infrastructure.Dr. Ferguson cited the establishment of the National Health Fund (NHF), which provides financial protection to citizens living with chronic diseases, as a critical measure in strengthening health coverage. “The NHF has expended approximately $3.5 billion on individual benefits for the last fiscal year,” he informed.He said implementation of the no user fees policy is also an important step in removing a barrier to health access, and the Government continues to seek practical and sustainable ways of financing health care, to further reduce out-of-pocket expense for citizens.“So, it is clear that we have been working and we have achieved a lot, but there is much work to do, especially because out-of-pocket payments is at 30 per cent of total health expenditure, and this is unacceptable,” he said.The high level dialogue ends on April 30. Photo: Dave ReidMinister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson (seated), looks at something of interest being pointed out by Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Dr. Kevin Harvey, during the opening ceremony for a high level dialogue meeting on universal access to health and universal health coverage, held on April 29, at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston. Gov’t to Craft 10-Year Development Plan for Health Sector Health & WellnessMay 1, 2015Written by: Chris Patterson Related40 Persons with Disabilities Learn New Skills Through Training Programme FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img RelatedHealth Minister Pleased With Rate of Vaccination Story HighlightsThe Government of Jamaica is to craft a 10-year development plan for the country’s health sector.Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, said the process will get underway this year, through Cabinet’s approval of the Primary Health Care Renewal Policy.The Health Minister was speaking on Wednesday, April 29, at the opening ceremony for a high level dialogue on Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston. Advertisements Gov’t to Craft 10-Year Development Plan for Health SectorJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaylast_img read more

The babushka, the alarm clock and the art of fundraising

first_imgOnce upon a time, when I was living in Ukraine, I met the staff of a community foundation named Dobrata that was trying to encourage businesspeople to give money to charitable causes. This was not an easy task in a country emerging from decades of Soviet rule and with no history of corporate philanthropy, and Dobrata staff expressed some disappointment over their problems in efforts to motivating motivate entrepreneurs.They showed me their latest advertisement, which they had aired on local television. It was an animated, black-and-white ad with mournful music playing in the background. A stooped babushka enters a pharmacy. She looks up at the shelves and then down at a few stray coins in her pocket. Tears slowly course down her cheeks. She is unable to buy the medicine she needs. A voice-over and accompanying text urge people to help by calling Dobrata. What happened when the ad ran? Dobrata was flooded with calls from babushkas asking for money to buy medicines. Virtually no one called to donate money. The main problems: lack of a clear audience and an appeal to that audience’s values. Businesspeople didn’t see the ad as meant for them. It was depressing—everyone in Ukraine knows the collapse of the Soviet Union hit pensioners hardest—but not personally motivating. No one believed a call to Dobrata could resolve this enormous social problem.After some reflection, Dobrata went back to the drawing board. The next time I saw their staff, they handed me a video of their new ad. It was a colorful, animated spot to be shown in movie theaters. This was a far better venue than television for reaching their audience, because only those who are relatively well-off, people like businesspeople, can afford to go to the movies in Ukraine. In the spot, a businessman is shown slumped over his desk, signing paper after paper handed to him by a secretary. He goes on autopilot, numbly working his way through massive stacks. The picture zooms into his brain, which has the cogs and wheels of a robot. Life has become mechanical and without feeling. Then an alarm clock goes off on his desk and suddenly the scene brightens. The secretary places before him a donation request from Dobrata, and he signs, breaks out of his rut, and regains his human self. A friendly voice-over and call to action (wake up and give to Dobrata) end the spot. The ad was funny, motivating, and memorable. It clearly spoke to businesspeople by whimsically highlighting the drudgery that comes with any job, especially in a country with lots of red tape. It positioned charitable giving as a way to fulfill a desire to break out of the grind and feel good. Dobrata hit its mark.I relate this story because it shows so much: The art of fundraising isn’t to show need — it’s to inspire action. Tears may attract attention but it’s hope that wins hearts. Don’t lose sight of the joy of giving.last_img read more